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Annual Management Improvement Carnival: Edition 1

It is always a great privilege to participate in Annual Management Improvement Carnival organized by John Hunter. I am thrilled to play the host at QAspire and I will be featuring my “four favorite” blogs in two editions. From time to time, these blogs educate me, stir up my thinking, change/challenge me and help me grow.

In this first edition, lets look at the first two blogs that I *love* reading.

Seth Godin’s Blog

Seth Godin needs no introduction – he is the most amazing thinker, doer, initiator, instigator and change agent. He inspires me (and the world) through his words and deeds. Finding a few posts that I really liked over last few years is just like showing a small tip of a huge iceberg, but I will still attempt! Here are the ones that really touched me:

  1. Self directed effort is the best kind: “The thing I care the most about: what do you do when no one is looking, what do you make when it’s not an immediate part of your job… how many push ups do you do, just because you can?
  2. You matter: “When you touch the people in your life through your actions (and your words), you matter.”
  3. The paradox of expectations:it’s worth considering no expectations. Intense effort followed by an acceptance of what you get in return. It doesn’t make good TV, but it’s a discipline that can turn you into a professional.

Bonus Resources:

  1. Blogger J. D. Meier compiled one of the best posts titled “Lessons Learned From Seth Godin”. Some of the best insights, blog posts and ebooks from Seth Godin, all at one place.
  2. Fellow friend Ivana Sendecka compiled “15 Must Watch Videos Collection of Seth Godin’s Wisdom”. A wonderful mash-up of Seth Godin’s best videos.
  3. Reviews of Seth Godin’s books “Poke the Box” and “Linchpin” at QAspire (containing one question interview with Seth).

Work Matter (Bob Sutton’s Blog)

Robert Sutton is Professor of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University. I have been a regular reader of Bob’s blog Work Matters where he writes about innovation, learning and leadership. His new book is Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best–and Learn from the Worst. Some of his best posts I like includes:

  1. New Research: We Are More Creative When We Help Others Than Ourselves:There is an interesting set of findings from psychological experiments that suggest we see others’ flaws and strengths more clearly than our own (I wrote about this in Good Boss, Bad Boss) and that, on average, human-beings make more rational decisions when make them for others rather than themselves.
  2. 17 Things I Believe: Updated and Expanded:Strive for simplicity and competence, but embrace the confusion and messiness along the way.
  3. 11 Signs You’re A Bad Boss: From AMEX OPEN Forum: One of them, “Implementation is for the little people. Your job is to develop and talk about big ideas, not to waste time thinking about all the little steps required to make them happen.”

Bonus Resources:

  1. Seth Godin’s ” The Paradox of Expectations” pays homage to the central teaching of the mentor-in-chief in Bhagavad Gita.
    Complete union with duty, work, action; detached from expectation of desired result or recognition.

    Such a contrast to current payment for performance, MBO models. Interestingly, Deming was very much against P4P, quotas.

    • @Setu Vora – I cannot agree more on correlation between Godin’s Paradox of Expectations and theory of ‘karma’. Re: Deming, he considered pay for performance and appraisals as one of his seven deadly sins. He emphasized on systems and culture that people work in, and its respective impact on individual performance.

      In knowledge/service oriented world, the spotlight is on “human” aspect of building culture and systems.

      Thanks for the comment and support to QAspire Blog.

      Best,
      Tanmay

  2. Wonderful work.
    This requires far more publicity, than publishing on this site -which has its own readership, amongst practicing quality professionals in India, at the least.
    I, for one, would share on all my sharing accounts.

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