In 100 Words: Boundary

We get too bogged down by our self-imposed boundaries.

Boss won’t allow.

That is not our process.

I’ve never been told!

Not my job.

They need to do it!

And it goes on. But what if we cross that boundary and get into the realm of:

What can I do?

Who can I influence?

How can we make it better?

How can I elicit their commitment for this?

It’s a different conversation that requires great deal of emotional labor. As Seth Godin says in Poke the Box, boundaries are in our heads, not anywhere else.


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The Spark of Initiative

There are people who coast along, go with the flow and do as directed. And then, there are those who strive to add value, raise the bar and make a difference.

If you belong to the latter, Seth Godin has some simple (yet profound) guidance for you. He wrote about three ways to add value – by doing things, by taking decisions and by initiating. Our education system trains us to do things efficiently. Our experience may lead us to a point where we can decide effectively what’s best for ourselves, our team, project and organization.

But we need to learn the art of initiating things ourselves; by having new ideas, starting small experiments, taking tiny risks, caring enough, exerting emotional labor, doing the right thing when no one is watching, learning along the way, adapting our approaches and then hopefully, see our ideas come to life.

“There are two mistakes one can make along the road to truth.

Not going all the way, and not starting.”

– Siddhartha Gautama

In his book “Poke the Box” Seth Godin wrote,

“The world is changing too fast. Without the spark of initiative, you have no choice but to simply react to the world. Without the ability to instigate and experiment, you are stuck, adrift, waiting to be shoved.”

In a future that is increasingly getting automated, it is this spark of initiative that is and would remain our real competitive advantage.

In 100 Words: Face The Light

 

In moments of uncertainty, inspiration came to me in form of a tweet with a visual that read,

“If you see shadows, it is because there is light.”

I instinctively told myself,

“If you face the light, shadows fall behind.”

The mindset of abundance asks, “What’s possible?” instead of “What could go wrong?” and focuses on those possibilities because constraints are almost a given in work and life.

Only then, we can start focusing on possibilities, thinking beyond the boundaries, raising the bar, stepping into the unknown and doing what truly matters.

We try. We err. And then, we learn!


Also Read at QAspire:

When Your Best Ideas are Shot Down

It is very likely that your best ideas will get shot down.

It happened with me a few years ago. I went to the boss with my bright idea that had potential to generate additional revenue for the organization. My idea was shot down at first. No wonder, I was disappointed.

When our best ideas are shot down, there are reasons behind it. Sometimes, you are not able to explain the idea in a way that it generates the required buy-in. Sometimes, your timing is just not correct. Most of the other times, people are not equipped to handle anxiety and fear that comes along when judging new ideas.

What do you do? Blame them for being dumb enough and not understanding your idea? Do nothing because the someone else shot it down or simply avoid sharing your ideas in future?

I have seen many professionals who just step back when their ideas are rejected. That is the easiest way out because it involves no risk. That’s also a lame strategy. The result? Your ideas never see the light of the day!

Coming back to my own experience, what did I do when my idea was shot down? I further validated my idea with a few more people. I researched about the potential of my idea. I collected research reports, industry trend analysis from leading consulting houses and I collected newspaper clippings about the recent trends. I compiled all of it and went back to boss again – this time with more conviction. My preparation paid off and my idea got a life!

So next time your bright idea is shot down, do a bit more research. Validate your own assumptions. Fine tune it if required. Put it out to the world. Seek more feedback. Adjust your approach.And most importantly – persist.

It is equally important to ensure that you don’t fall in love with your idea just because it is “yours”. So be flexible when your ideas fail to generate required validation.

Your organization needs your ideas. Just because someone else is not able to ‘get it’ at first does not mean your ideas are not worthy. Just give it one more try – this time with more preparation, zeal and conviction.

If your idea is really worthy, it is your obligation to bring it to life.

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Join in the conversation: Were your ideas ever shot down? How did you handle the rejection and what did you learn out of it?

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