On Disrupting Yourself

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me.


During 2001 dot com bubble, one of my friends, a competent software developer, was laid off because of lack of business in the technology he worked in. He was smart enough to understand that the company needed people in a new project that was to be developed on a totally different technology. He learned the new technology, re-skilled himself fast enough to face a client interview for the new project and was retained even before his notice period got over.

In my formative years, he stood as an example of someone who totally disrupted himself when he was forced by external circumstances. Obviously, today’s complex and fast changing world demands individuals to disrupt themselves based on internal drivers of change, before external circumstances compel them to change.

In a business context, there are many organizations like 3M, Apple, NetFlix and Google whose success can be attributed to their ability to disrupt themselves continuously.

In this episode of What’s Next podcast, one of my favorite authors and thinkers Whitney Johnson says,

“Not just products, services and companies, the fundamental unit of disruption is an individual.”

Individuals disrupt themselves when they take some risk, do things that they have never done before, learn constantly, connect the dots and think about intersections between current reality (what they have done so far) and possibilities (what they could do with all innovations around them).

One of her key advices in the podcast is:

“Play to your strengths, not just what you do well but what others don’t.”

The insights in this podcast are very relevant to individuals and businesses alike.

Here is a high-level sketch note summary of this excellent conversation, which I encourage you to check out.

Tanmay Vora Whitney Johnson Sketchnote

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Insights on High-Tech and High-Touch Customer Experience

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me.


Common perception is that people who face the customers are accountable for customer experience. Larger organizations often fall in the trap of defining customer experience KPI’s only to executive teams, sales, marketing and customer services teams.
 
What about those who build the products? And those who recruit people? And those in backend operations? And how all of them collaborate to achieve business outcomes?
 
We see things in parts and therefore, fix things in parts. And even when parts are (sub) optimized, the whole may not have improved.
 
This equation gets even more complex in an AI driven world where customers expect personalized services.
 
In this episode of Whats Next! podcast, Tamara McCleary (CEO at Thulium.co) shares some useful insights on how technology advancements like AI and machine learning can enable companies to learn rapidly about the customers and personalize the experience at scale. This is critical because marketers think about selling to ‘customer segments’ where as customers expect personalized services based on their individual preferences.
 
Companies have to leverage “high-tech” to achieve “high-touch”
 
For everyone to own customer experience within a company, leaders have to start with a vision of what amazing customer experience looks like, build a culture of leadership at all levels, define systemic metrics (like Net Promoter Score) that everyone can strive for and finally incentivize people for their contributions to customer experience.
 
When leaders look at the whole, they provide a way for all departments to work towards the same outcomes and for everyone to clearly know that their work impacts customer experience.
 
Here is a visual summary of insights from the podcast episode, which you can listen here.
 
tamara-mccleary

 


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Seth Godin on The Human Side of Business

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me.


Seth Godin’s work has influenced me a LOT. In fact, his book “Linchpin” transformed the way I saw my work as a leader and change maker. I have interacted with Seth twice on this blog before when I reviewed his books.

Here is an insight from the podcast episode that resonated the most with me:

“Great marketers do service. They say, “How do I serve this group of people?How do I educate them? How do I open the door for them?”

I think that great leaders share the same traits as great marketers because they exist to serve, raise the bar, initiate change and open new possibilities – and they do this consistently.

Ultimately, the experience we deliver to our people is as important as the results we deliver. Experience is the product, whatever your business may be.

I also loved the emphasis Seth puts on taking responsibility and sharing the credits. Most people stuck in mediocrity approach it the other way around – they want the credit without taking responsibility. Authority is elusive when you explicitly chase it. It is, in fact, a by-product of focusing on delivering value.

Listen to the podcast for these and more brilliant insights, and read this post by Tiffani Bova on HuffPost.

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