Leadership and Trust: 3 Elements

I see many business leaders who excessively focus of creating a grand vision, have a compelling strategy, run great communication programs and have innovative ideas but still fail to engage people and get desired results.

That’s because they don’t focus enough on the foundation of leadership – building trust. In absence of trust, results don’t happen. In absence of results, people trust the leader even less. And it becomes a downward spiral.

Here’s what I have broadly learned about building trust from my own experience:

  • Trust starts with intentional clarity. Before you starting acting on your plans, you need to clarify your intent, understand the intent of others and arrive at a point where intent overlaps and aligns.
  • Trust happens when you deliver on that intent and make a positive impact on your people, customers and stakeholders. When things you do show that you care, people start trusting you.
  • Trust goes deeper through consistency in thoughts, words, actions and results (they call it integrity).

Leaders (and organizations) build trust primarily on the foundation of consistent results, great relationships and expertise. In their recent HBR article, Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman touch upon three foundational elements of trust – Positive Relationships, Good Judgment and Expertise and Consistency.

In their post, they underline the importance of positive relationships:

Intuitively we thought that consistency would be the most important element. Saying one thing and doing another seems like it would hurt trust the most. While our analysis showed that inconsistency does have a negative impact (trust went down 17 points), it was relationships that had the most substantial impact. When relationships were low and both judgment and consistency were high, trust went down 33 points. This may be because many leaders are seen as occasionally inconsistent. We all intend to do things that don’t get done, but once a relationship is damaged or if it was never formed in the first place, it’s difficult for people to trust.

Do read the full post at HBR and here is a short visual summary of the key insights:

96_trust_hbr_tanmayvora

More on “Building Trust” at QAspire.com

The Art of Successful Giving: Adam Grant

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me. Tiffani is also the author of a WSJ bestseller book “Growth IQ: Get Smarter About the Choices that Will Make or Break Your Business


We don’t accomplish anything meaningful in isolation. We have to interact and work with other people to get anything significant done. And our approach to these interpersonal interactions play a huge role in our ability to focus, work and add value.

Too often, we often see people who are generous with how much they share with others without any expectation, people who wait to get something first before they start giving and people who simply use other people’s skills and approaches to get their own work done.

In this episode of What’s Next podcast with Tiffani Bova, Adam Grant shares his insights on successful giving. He outlines three styles of interpersonal interactions in teams and organizations – giving, taking and matching. Here’s what they look like:

  • Givers: “What Can I do for you?”
  • Takers: “What can you do for me?”
  • Matchers: “I’ll do something for you if you do something for me”

Earlier in my career, I often ended up doing other people’s job simply because they delegated their work to me as my seniors. Over a period of time, I had to learn to say no and set boundaries (and the truth is I still find it difficult to say no sometimes). If I timidly served all requests that I got, I would have spread myself thin accomplishing things for others but not for the purpose I was serving.

I did not want to be a failed giver who thinks they have to give in every role and relationship.

Adam Grant mentions that that successful givers set boundaries on who they help, how they help and when they help and focus on giving where they can add maximum value.

What resonated with me the most was that successful giving is not about being nice and agreeable all the time. In fact, as Adam points out, successful giving (and adding real value) happens by being disagreeable, challenging the status quo, giving tough feedback and pointing out problems.

Effective teams, he says, is a combination of givers and matchers where as takers suck the energy out of the team and they should be screened out.

Do check out the full podcast episode here for more ideas. Here is a sketch note summary of some of the key insights.

Tiffani Bova AdamGrant v1 600px

Other Sketchnotes from WhatsNext Podcast:

3L’s of Self-Directed Learning: Insights from My TEDx Talk

I started 2019 by delivering a TEDx talk at TEDxGCET in Vallabh Vidyanagar. This post covers a few key insights extracted from the talk. Video to be posted soon.


Formal education is a launch pad that equips us with fundamentals. But we need wings to fly long and high in the direction of our dreams. Ability to learn in a self-initiated mode is one of the most critical skills to thrive in a rapidly changing world.

“In times of profound change, the learners inherit the earth, while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists.” – Eric Hoffer

Real learning is an inside-out process. It starts from a deep internal desire to know something, do something and change something. That’s when you take charge of your own learning.

If I look at my own journey and connect the dots, I find three things that that forms my 3L framework for self-directed learning.

The first L is “Labor of Love”

My son is fascinated by drawing and he loves creating greeting cards. When he is immersed in the process of making the card, he completely loses the sense of time and place. Fully concentrated in creating the lines and coloring.

For him, it is not work but it is play. He does it NOT because someone is asking him to do it. He does it because HE finds pleasure in it.

That to me is labor of love. Playing where our passion is. The key questions to ask then are:

  • What is it that you would do even if no one paid you to do it or asked you to do it?
  • What are your intrinsic skills – things that come naturally to you?
  • What puts you in the flow state?
  • What change do you truly want to see around you?

From an early age, I wrote because I wanted to express myself. This need to express translated into other related mediums like blogging, speaking, leading teams, running organizations, writing books and creating sketch notes.

In each case, I started at a very basic level but when I continued doing it persistently, I eventually got better at it.

When we play at the intersection of passion and effort, we elevate our game and improvise without even noticing it.

The second L is for “Lifelong Learning”

Our school system trains us to be passive learners and we always rely on someone else for our learning.

The essence of self-directed learning is to keep the inner fire alive, have an open and curious mind, , creating new knowledge through action and experimentation, make new connections to your existing knowledge, improve upon your skills and collaborate with others. It is about exposing yourself to diverse experiences and disciplines to generate independent thought and recognize patterns.

My journey into social media and blogging taught me one of the most important things about self-driven learning:

We don’t learn anything in isolation and our best learning happens when we learn with others.

Internet has made it easier to find your heroes, watch them do the work and learn from their journeys. We need to invest in finding likeminded people to share our work with, draw inspiration from, learn and collaborate.

Network and community is a great learning enabler.

One more element of lifelong learning is having a multidisciplinary approach to work. When you pursue different disciplines, you can easily use expertise from one domain into a totally different area.

Differentiation in career and innovation always happens where two disciplines intersect.

My sketchnote project is the intersection of my ideas from my blog and my drawing practice from 20 years ago when I was preparing for architecture entrance exam.

In his Stanford commencement speech, Steve Jobs said that when he was studying at Reed College, he got into learning calligraphy. And many years later, his understanding of calligraphy inspired beautiful typography in Apple products.

He nailed it when he said that dots eventually connect. Whatever we choose to do, it eventually connects.

Lifelong learning and multiple interests empower us to seize unique possibilities when faced with adversity.

Finally, the third L is “Leverage”

Leverage, in simplest terms means finding a way to make a positive impact for yourself and others through your learning. It is about putting your learning to good use. We don’t truly learn till we execute our learning to solve real world problems.

My leadership improved when I looked at my role as a way to serve those I was responsible for.

Real learning is in the act, in putting your learning to significant service of others. Your work becomes art when it changes the self and others for better.

Today, knowledge has become a commodity and everything you want to know is out there on internet. We have moved from an industrial world to knowledge world to a creative world now. In this world, what you know is not as important as what you do with it and how you apply your knowledge to solve real world problems.

We are living in the golden age of self-directed learning. Getting information, sharing your work and connecting with others is just a click away. We have a world of possibilities now open to us.

The problem is that we are used to navigate with the help of predefined maps. Self-Directed Learning is an exploration of what lies within us, what lies outside of us and finding that sweet intersection where the magic really happens.

That’s when you truly learn things that are unique to you. That’s when you can differentiate yourself.

That’s when you stand a chance to change the world within and outside for better.


Here is the visual summary of the talk in a #sketchnote form.

tanmayvora-tedx-selfdirectedlearning


And, here is the picture of me delivering the talk Smile

IMG_2878

Looking Back at 2018

This blog has been my online home for over 12 years, even before I got onto Facebook and Twitter. The blog has evolved along with me. It is a platform for me to learn, think clearly and share whatever I learn through posts and sketchnotes.

This blog has had an amazing journey so far. Hundreds of posts, tens of thousands of readers each month and plenty of social sharing just encourages me further to continue this journey.

This year was a slow one for blogging but here is a round up of some of the most popular post written in 2018:

For 2019, one of my intentions is to get back to blogging more regularly (once a week) and get into a regular rhythm of consuming meaningful stuff, thinking, reflecting on my experiences, learning and sharing.

The Year of Sketchnotes Going Places

My pursuit of synthesizing and curating my lessons through sketchnotes found newer grounds.

One of the major milestones in this journey was visualizing case studies for Tiffani Bova’s new book “Growth IQ – Get Smarter About the Choices that Will Make or Break Your Business” and it was a great learning experience.

growthiq

It is an amazing book that became a Wall Street Journal bestseller within a few weeks and Tiffani has squeezed years of experience in this book to outline 10 growth paths through well researched case studies for each growth path.

Apart from this, sketch notes also went places and here are a few glimpses:

selfies

I created a sketchnote selfie last year and it inspired Claire (National Health Services, UK) to encourage her workshop participants to create their sketchnote selfies. Here are a bunch of people with their sketchnote selfies!

ATD

My blog was featured in Training and Development magazine (published by Association of Training and Development) last year with a special mention of sketchnotes.

EurpoeanComm

My sketchnote on “Working Out Loud” was featured at European Commission in June.

wol

Karyn Prather from Kimberly Clark (a consumer packaged goods company that has created strong five billion-dollar brands including Huggies, Kleenex, and Scott) presented my sketchnote (and insights from the amazing John Stepper) at Microsoft Ignite Content 2018, Orlando FL in September 2018.

AIM

My #sketchnote on Mindset Shifts for Transformation was presented at AIM Norway Symposium, University of Oslo by Thomas Anglero. AIM stands for Artificial Intelligence, Minds+Machines.

tubblog3

tubblog1

Richard Tubb for sharing my insights and sketchnote to French IT and MSP companies in early December at Paris.

My biggest lesson from all this?

Labor of love is powerful. Applying what you learn is powerful. And when your gifts are deployed in significant service of others through generous sharing, it results in leverage and learning.

Grateful for all the Recognitions

I consider all recognitions as by-products of the pursuit and once in a while, when you think of them, they only encourage the pursuit.

For the Fifth consecutive year, I was fortunate to be ranked amongst Top 30 Indian HR Influencers on Social Media in May 2018.

Also, a big thanks to my friend Kurt Harden for including QAspire blog in his annual list of “25 Blogs Guaranteed to Make You Smarter” for 6th consecutive year. Love all the selections in this list and always grateful for his generosity.

Change is a Constant Work

At work, it was again a year of change. Leading an organization in times of change is a challenge and an opportunity to learn a great deal in the process. Nothing in business is (and can be) stagnant and job of leaders is to communicate relentlessly and enable people make sense of changes. Leaders create an ecosystem where people not only adapt to change but also contribute positively to it.

And Other Stuff

I tried as much as possible to stay close to my intent of consuming less and creating more, dwelling in possibility and simplifying. I think I can do better on that last bit of simplifying since I have a tendency to take on more than I can handle.

Competing with the self is always exhausting because you never win!  But guided by intent of learning constantly, sharing generously and putting it al to good use, my journey continues.

A Note of Gratitude

This blog is not possible without YOU – who care to read what I write, share it along widely and encourage me all the way. I am extremely grateful for everyone who read this blog, are connected on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Here’s to a glorious 2019!

Peter Senge on Leadership Development

Real leadership does not happen after we get hold of lofty titles and peak positions in the hierarchy.

Real leadership happens when we are aware of our gifts (given to us), when we hone those gifts in the spirit of serving others, when we find whitespaces (gap between our vision and the current reality) and put our gifts to good use in filling up those gaps. Real leadership happens irrespective of external validations and titles. In fact, titles and external validations are only the by-products of the pursuit.

The reward of leadership is not just the difference we make to the context or to the people we work with, but also the kind of person we may become as a result of the pursuit.

Peter Senge on Developing Leaders

The Fifth Discipline – The Art and Practice of Learning Organization” by Peter Senge is such a profound book that each time I revisit it, I find something deep in a way that it serves as a timely reminder for initiatives that I may be working on. The book has an entire section that really clarifies what being a leader really looks like.

It was interesting to know that the root of the word “leadership” comes from Indo-European word “leith” which means to cross a threshold. It points to having courage to extend the boundaries, think differently and going beyond the normal call of duty.

The heart of leadership development lies in the word “charisma” as Peter Senge clarifies it.

“In fact, the word ‘charism’ comes from the Catholic church, where it means one’s distinctive personal “gifts” given  by the Holy spirit. To be charismatic, then, means to develop one’s gift. In short, we develop as true charismatic leaders to the extent that we become ourselves.”

The section outlines the concept of creative tension – that all great leaders have to deal with the tension between holding a vision and deeply assessing the current reality. It is the gap between the two that becomes a force of change. It is the source of all great leadership – at a personal level as well at an organizational level.

Finally, Senge argues that real leaders rarely see themselves as leaders. Instead, they focus on doing the work – on what needs to be done, the larger system in which they operate and people they work with.

Here is a visual summary of a particular section focusing on leadership development.

94_Leadership_Senge_650px

Related Posts at QAspire.com

5 Pointers on How to Think Clearly

Developing clarity in thinking is becoming even more important in a world that is constantly trying to distract you. Overload of information being pushed at us, contrasting theories about almost everything, our own unconscious biases, ego and fear hamper our ability to look clearly through the fog.

If we improve how we think, we also  improve how we lead teams, develop people, innovate, solve important problems and grow as individuals.

When I read this post by Charles Chu at The Polymath Project titled “A Few Principles on Thinking Clearly”, I realized that sometimes the thing that impairs our thinking is our own ego, fears and motivations. That we are not motivated to think clearly on issues where we don’t have skin in the game. That models are linear but reality is not. That we need to think across disciplines to solve important problems.

In this post, Charles offers some principles on how to think clearly from the Czech-Canadian polymath Vaclav Smil. I encourage you to read the full post and here are my visual notes outlining the key insights from the post.

92_ThinkClearly900px

Share to Learn

91_sharetolearn

If you are doing work that you love (or love the work you do), you learn something new every single day.

This could be something you experienced, something you noticed, something thought-provoking that you read, something that worked for you (or others around you). And it is also very likely that someone out there precisely needs that help, spark of idea, wisdom and insight.

Technology has made it all the more easier to share with others, learn from others and build a community by doing so consistently. You can choose your platforms to share on, or you can create your own platform (like your own blog).

Tools really does not matter as much.

What matters is that you find your voice and courage to express your thinking.

That you build a posture of generosity when you share your insights along.

What matters is what you learn during the process of sharing, articulating and shipping your thoughts out to the world – consistently and deliberately.

Clarity of thought that you develop as a result of sharing regularly. The dots that you connect as you see your ideas unfold in increments.

And the relationships you build with your community as you add (and gain) value in tiny bursts regularly.

That makes it all worthwhile in a long run.


Related Posts on QAspire:

In 100 Words: Giving Attention

  23_QS_Attention

Everybody we meet is trying to get attention through tactics. More clicks, eyeballs, likes. What if you focus more on giving attention?

What do you deeply care about? What are you trying to make happen? Who are you trying to help? These are good questions to find out what truly matters and then pay attention to only those things.

“Attention is the rarest and purest form of generosity.” – Simone Weil

That’s what great leadership is all about. Not just competing to get more attention but using the privilege of leadership to pay attention to enabling people and things that matter.


 Also Read at QAspire:

Technology and Being Human

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me. Tiffani is also the author of a new book “Growth IQ: Get Smarter About the Choices that Will Make or Break Your Business” due for release in August 2018.


Sometimes, when I see a group of people sitting physically with each other yet engrossed in their mobile screens, I feel that technology has turned us into gadgets and made us less human.

Sure, social media has transformed how we connect, collaborate and learn. But it also seems to be taking a huge toll on precisely those things that make us human.

We are not gadgets. We are capable of thinking deep, connecting the dynamic dots, be creative and solve important problems in novel ways. We are capable of dreaming, hoping, perceiving, creating, telling stories, collaborating and connecting. We are capable of deep work and generosity. And these are the things that make us human. This is how we become wise in a world where knowledge is essentially commoditized.

The key then is to leverage the social platforms as much for our learning, connecting meaningfully and collaborating rather than just allow platforms to entice us into mindless consumption.

Austin Kleon, someone whose work and art I admire posted the following:

Do more things that make you forget to check the phone.

Creativity and learning stems from doing meaningful stuff in a way that serves the community and changes others for better. That is at the heart of embracing craftsman spirit.

Do check out the wonderful podcast episode with Arianna Huffington and here is a sketchnote summary of some of the key insights.

AriannaHuffington_1000px

Related Reading at QAspire:

Building a Culture of Excellence: Tom Peters

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me. Tiffani is also the author of a new book “Growth IQ: Get Smarter About the Choices that Will Make or Break Your Business” due for release in August 2018.


It is safe to assume that every CEO would have priority building a culture of Excellence because ultimately excellence drives growth and makes a company memorable.

Today, we have a bunch of complex models to help organizations become excellent, but in the pursuit of implementing these complex capability models, organizations forget that excellence is as much about people as it is about the process. It is as much about the small things as it is about the big things.

In a world that is obsessed with complexity, Tom Peters advocates simple things to enable a culture of excellence. He says,

“Embracing new technology is incredibly important, but EXCELLENCE IS HUMAN.”

Excellence is all about being close to your customers, creating ecosystems where best people can do their best work, developing people, listening, caring, smiling and saying “Thank you” often enough. These are not complex things, yet for many leaders, these are the most difficult things to do. And these simple things are at the core of excellence.

Please listen to this episode of the podcast and I am pretty sure it will be thought provoking, as it always is with whatever Tom shares.

Here is my sketchnote summary of the key nuggets of wisdom Tom Peters shared in this podcast episode.

08_tompeters_950px

Also See:

Leadership: Humility and Focusing on Others

I often meet business leaders who are so full of themselves. When interacting with others, they try to keep the needle of focus constantly towards themselves, their business, accomplishments and stories.

It is easy to get caught up in the self because after all, you are a up there and you make things happen (or so you think!).

In one of the leadership workshop I attended in early years of my career, the trainer beautifully described humility as

Humility is like the banks of a river that gives direction to the flowing water without possessing it.

Leadership in any form is about others. A leader is just a means to an end. A steward of the larger cause, whatever it may be.

Like banks of a river, leader holds the context together in order to channel the energies of people. A leader enables flow (progress) by enabling others, asking right questions, coaching others and learning in the process. The focus of a leadership conversation is the needs of others, needs of the context and needs of the customers.

I read Dan Rockwell’s recent post titled “The Seductions of Arrogance Compound the Elusiveness of Humility” where he outlines 5 practices of humble leadership. It is a thought provoking post that emphasizes on ‘practicing’ humility by focusing on others.

Some critical questions to consider, whether you lead a kid, a team of professionals or an organization, are:

  • How often do you, as a leader, brag about others?
  • How many times do you turn the focus of conversation on others?
  • How many times have you stood up to accept responsibility, especially of failures?
  • When was the last time you thought about amplifying someone’s strength rather than focusing on their shortcomings?

Here is a quick short sketchnote summary of Dan Rockwell’s 5 practices of humble leadership (Read the full post here)

90_humbleleadership_700px

Update: If you are an email subscriber, please refer to our Privacy Policy here.

On Disrupting Yourself

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me.


During 2001 dot com bubble, one of my friends, a competent software developer, was laid off because of lack of business in the technology he worked in. He was smart enough to understand that the company needed people in a new project that was to be developed on a totally different technology. He learned the new technology, re-skilled himself fast enough to face a client interview for the new project and was retained even before his notice period got over.

In my formative years, he stood as an example of someone who totally disrupted himself when he was forced by external circumstances. Obviously, today’s complex and fast changing world demands individuals to disrupt themselves based on internal drivers of change, before external circumstances compel them to change.

In a business context, there are many organizations like 3M, Apple, NetFlix and Google whose success can be attributed to their ability to disrupt themselves continuously.

In this episode of What’s Next podcast, one of my favorite authors and thinkers Whitney Johnson says,

“Not just products, services and companies, the fundamental unit of disruption is an individual.”

Individuals disrupt themselves when they take some risk, do things that they have never done before, learn constantly, connect the dots and think about intersections between current reality (what they have done so far) and possibilities (what they could do with all innovations around them).

One of her key advices in the podcast is:

“Play to your strengths, not just what you do well but what others don’t.”

The insights in this podcast are very relevant to individuals and businesses alike.

Here is a high-level sketch note summary of this excellent conversation, which I encourage you to check out.

Tanmay Vora Whitney Johnson Sketchnote

Related Posts at QAspire

Nancy Duarte on Storytelling in Business

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me.


When driving large scale change, leaders often fall in trap of presenting the current reality and future state in form of data, numbers and charts. Data and information may provide clarity to people, in itself, they fail to connect people emotionally to ideas.

That is an area where modern advancements like AI with all its information generating capabilities, will still not fill the human need to connect emotionally.

For that, leaders need an ability to empathize with current realities of people, tell stories that resonate, in a way that inspire thinking and provokes meaningful change in how people operate on a day to day basis.

In this episode of What’s Next podcast, Nancy Duarte, a communications and persuasion expert discusses ideas on how to use storytelling and emotional connection to engage people/customers better. Do check it out.

While I present the sketchnote summary of this excellent podcast conversation, I also encourage you to watch Nancy’s famous TED Talk, The Secret Structure of Great Talks, which is viewed over a million times.

NancyDuarte


Related Reading at QAspire:

Insights on High-Tech and High-Touch Customer Experience

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me.


Common perception is that people who face the customers are accountable for customer experience. Larger organizations often fall in the trap of defining customer experience KPI’s only to executive teams, sales, marketing and customer services teams.
 
What about those who build the products? And those who recruit people? And those in backend operations? And how all of them collaborate to achieve business outcomes?
 
We see things in parts and therefore, fix things in parts. And even when parts are (sub) optimized, the whole may not have improved.
 
This equation gets even more complex in an AI driven world where customers expect personalized services.
 
In this episode of Whats Next! podcast, Tamara McCleary (CEO at Thulium.co) shares some useful insights on how technology advancements like AI and machine learning can enable companies to learn rapidly about the customers and personalize the experience at scale. This is critical because marketers think about selling to ‘customer segments’ where as customers expect personalized services based on their individual preferences.
 
Companies have to leverage “high-tech” to achieve “high-touch”
 
For everyone to own customer experience within a company, leaders have to start with a vision of what amazing customer experience looks like, build a culture of leadership at all levels, define systemic metrics (like Net Promoter Score) that everyone can strive for and finally incentivize people for their contributions to customer experience.
 
When leaders look at the whole, they provide a way for all departments to work towards the same outcomes and for everyone to clearly know that their work impacts customer experience.
 
Here is a visual summary of insights from the podcast episode, which you can listen here.
 
tamara-mccleary

 


Related Reading at QAspire:

Seth Godin on The Human Side of Business

I created a series of sketch notes for Tiffani Bova’s “What’s Next” podcast where she meets brilliant people to discuss customer experience, growth and innovation. Tiffani Bova is a Global Customer Growth and Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce. I will post sketchnote versions of selected podcast episodes that enlightened me.


Seth Godin’s work has influenced me a LOT. In fact, his book “Linchpin” transformed the way I saw my work as a leader and change maker. I have interacted with Seth twice on this blog before when I reviewed his books.

Here is an insight from the podcast episode that resonated the most with me:

“Great marketers do service. They say, “How do I serve this group of people?How do I educate them? How do I open the door for them?”

I think that great leaders share the same traits as great marketers because they exist to serve, raise the bar, initiate change and open new possibilities – and they do this consistently.

Ultimately, the experience we deliver to our people is as important as the results we deliver. Experience is the product, whatever your business may be.

I also loved the emphasis Seth puts on taking responsibility and sharing the credits. Most people stuck in mediocrity approach it the other way around – they want the credit without taking responsibility. Authority is elusive when you explicitly chase it. It is, in fact, a by-product of focusing on delivering value.

Listen to the podcast for these and more brilliant insights, and read this post by Tiffani Bova on HuffPost.

01_sethgodin_small

Also Read:

Storytelling: Begin With The End in Mind

Stories and narratives that touch us emotionally have power to transform us. When hearing a moving speech, story or talk, we feel that it is delivered effortlessly but we know it doesn’t happen on its own.

I have learned that:

A performance that feels effortless is often the peak point of great preparation behind the scenes.

As leaders, our ability to tell stories that resonate at an emotional level with others is at the heart of elevating aspirations and sparking change.

Bernadette Jiwa is one of my favorite bloggers because she packs a lot of substance in a few words. She recently wrote a short post on “How to Craft a Powerful Message” which outlines three steps to create a story that resonates.

Most speakers focus on what they want to/have to share. But great storytelling starts with an understanding of the audience, aligning your message to needs of the context and then delivering it in a way that creates impact.

Here is a quick visual summary of the post:

89_message_650px

Related posts at QAspire:

Three Levels of Trust in Relationships

A lot of people I meet use the expression, “Trust me…” or “Believe me…” in an attempt to build confidence. Do we trust them, just because they are asking us to?

Trust is not something you demand, it is something that you have to earn through clarity of intent (why), actions that support that intent (what) and most importantly take those actions with utmost integrity and human connection (how). And we have to do this consistently because trust is built one step at a time.

And unless people trust us, they would not care about our competence. Therefore, leaders have to truly connect before they can lead.

We commonly use the word ‘trust’ in business environment but how often do we care about what kind of trust we are expecting from others? I learned about three levels of trust through this excellent post by Randy Conley.

Also Read: Employee Engagement: 4 Basic Human Needs (by Randy Conley)

Let’s say, a new member joins your team and during induction process, the new team member understands the governing processes, explicit policies and implicit expectations while also being aware of the consequences. Through processes, we know that new member will not be able to violate the essentials. Conley defines this as deterrence based trust.

As we work with the new team member through a longer period, seeing them deliver the outcomes, we build our experience with them. At this point we know that they are aligned to the same intent and we have sufficient knowledge about their behavior and reactions. Conley defines this as knowledge based trust.

But most intimate level of trust is what Conley defines as “Identity” based trust. This is way deeper than just knowing a person. This is about having deep connection with intrinsic motivations of an individual. We understand them at a level of their hopes, aspirations and fears. And yet, we don’t misuse them. We give them the space to be their most authentic selves.

Most effective mentoring relationships I have seen – whether they are between parents and their kids, teachers and their students or between professionals – have this depth of trust.

Conley argues that this kind of trust is reserved for most important people in life, but with right boundaries, building this trust at workplace unlocks creativity and productivity.

Here is a quick sketchnote of ideas presented in Conley’s post.

So, next time you end up using the word “Trust”, do a quick check on what level of trust you are referring to.

88_trustRelated Resources at QAspire

Creativity: Jane Kenyon’s Wise Words to Live By

How will we create and learn if we don’t step down the endless treadmill of consumption? If we keep on adding things and stuff without practicing the fine art of subtraction?

Creativity and learning stems from our inner connection, meaningful conversations and mindful consumption that truly feed us internally.

Here are some wisest words from Jane Kenyon to live a creative life. (source: This post on Brainpickings)

Related Posts at QAspire:

Being Conscious About Our Unconscious Biases

I attended a very interesting workshop a few weeks ago on the topic of “Unconscious Bias” facilitated by Smita Tharoor. I was interested in this topic because I explored the intersection of critical thinking and leadership a few years ago. This was a good opportunity to get back to the topic and add to my understanding.

What is Unconscious Bias

The term ‘cognitive bias’ was coined by Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman in 1972 which quite simply means “our tendency to filter information, process facts and arrive at judgments based on our past experiences, likes/dislikes and automatic influences.”

How do these biases show up in Leadership?

A lot of leadership is about taking decisions involving group of people. Instinctive leaders often tend to decide quickly based on limited information or experience they have at hand. The result is that they end up taking wrong decisions (which may have worked for them in past but may not work in a different context), or discriminating with people of a certain color, race, sex or nationality based on their past experiences with similar people.  At work, biases (or the perception of bias) is the biggest contributor to people disengagement and cost of disengagement is huge. Lack of critical thinking also leads to short-termism where decisions are taken for immediate gains and solutions of today become thorny problems of tomorrow.

Some Ways to Deal with Unconscious Bias

Get Conscious. Be more aware about unconscious cognitive biases. Knowing that they exist is the first important step to tackling them. And they exist in plenty. Here is a list of all unconscious biases and what they really mean.

Ask questions, often. When considering a decision, ask questions that elicit understanding and clarify details. When you ask questions, you extend an opportunity to others to really express them. You are extending an opportunity to yourself to understand their thinking more closely. Encourage a culture where asking questions is valued.

Look for Patterns. Data over a period of time reveals patterns. Looking for patterns from the results of past decision can lead to important insights and learning. Sometimes data can blind us unless we learn to look at the pattern and story behind the data.

Look for the contrary. It helps playing a devil’s advocate and taking a contrarian view of things. It not only challenges others to think harder but also helps you in really understanding if they are just defending their own biases.

Embrace Diversity. This starts with hiring decisions. Don’t hire people whose beliefs are compliant with yours. You will tap into diverse ideas and viewpoints only when you have people with diverse thinking patterns on your team.

Attend to data and evidences. When you ask your people to bring data, evidences and trends, it does not mean lack of trust. It only means that you are intentional about serving them better by taking the right decisions.

Communicate clearly. Clear and accurate communication is a leader’s tool #1. Avoid using generic terms to describe people, situations and things. Biases are most commonly visible in how a leader communicates. Being mindful about our words is critical to thinking and communicating objectively.

Here is a sketchnote summary of the discussions during the workshop.

87_Bias1

Also Read at QAspire:

In 100 Words: Unexpected Paths

Unexpected Paths Tanmay VoraWe decide. We experience. We Learn. And then we adapt.

We can never be certain if our decisions will turn out the way we anticipate. Sometimes, even when we have done all the critical thinking before deciding, success of a decision depends on context as well.

So, what if we change our perspective about our decisions. What if we consciously move away from our finite definitions of what is right or wrong and trust the process?

Only then can we open ourselves to new learning and opportunities.

How else shall we tread the unexpected paths? How else shall we learn?

– – – – –

Also Read at QAspire: