In 100 Words: Pursuit of Happiness

In a group activity during a seminar, one balloon each is given to all 100 participants who were asked to write their name on it. Balloons were collected, jumbled and put in another room. When people were asked to find balloon with their name in 5 minutes, chaos ruled!

Then, speaker asked them to pick up any balloon and give it to person whose name was written on it. Within minutes, everyone had their balloons!

Speaker said, “Happiness is like these balloons. Try to find yours and you won’t get it. Extend it to others and you will get yours!”


Also Read:

Hector and the Search for #Happiness

Hector and the Search for Happiness” is a novel written by Francois Lelord which was converted into a movie by the same name in 2014. I have not read the book but I am fortunate to have seen the movie last week while I was on the flight back home from Finland.

Hector is a psychiatrist who loves helping people but is not happy with his own mundane life. While meeting with his patients, he realizes that most of his patients are not really ill but just unhappy. Hector, unable to help his patients because of his own discontentment, decides to take a break and travel the world to do some research on what makes people truly happy. He goes on a solo trip since his fiancée has to stay at home and focus on work. What follows is a series of experiences that shapes Hector’s thinking about happiness while he experiences life and relationships more deeply and profoundly. He jots these lessons down in a notebook gifted to him by his fiancée. 

Here is what he writes in his notebook. (Emphasis added to the lessons that really struck me hard).

  • Making comparisons can spoil your happiness.
  • Happiness often comes when least expected.
  • Many people only see happiness in their future.
  • Many people think that happiness comes from having more power or more money.
  • Sometimes happiness is not knowing the whole story.
  • Happiness is a long walk in beautiful, unfamiliar mountains.
  • It’s a mistake to think that happiness is the goal.
  • Happiness is being with the people that you love. Unhappiness is being separated from the people that you love.
  • Happiness is knowing that your family lacks for nothing.
  • Happiness is answering your calling.
  • Happiness is having a home and a garden of your own.
  • It’s harder to be happy in a country run by bad people.
  • Happiness is feeling useful to others.
  • Happiness is to be loved for exactly who you are.
  • Happiness comes when you feel truly alive.
  • Happiness is knowing how to celebrate.
  • Avoiding unhappiness is not the road to happiness.
  • Happiness is caring about the happiness of those you love.
  • Listening is Loving. 
  • The Sun and the Sea make everybody happy.
  • Happiness is not attaching too much importance to what other people think.
  • Happiness is a certain way of seeing things.
  • Rivalry ruins happiness.
  • Happiness is not a destination. It’s a state of being.
  • Fear is an impediment to happiness.
  • Happiness means making sure that those around you are happy

In the movie, Hector meets Prof. Coreman who had written a book on happiness after studying the effects of happiness on brain. In one of the lectures, Prof. Coreman says something very important.

“People shouldn’t be concerned about pursuit of happiness, but with the happiness of pursuit.” 

Each lesson may look discrete at first but when woven into our experiences and situations, these lessons are profound enough. And for that, you must either read the book or watch the movie!


Related Posts at QAspire:

In 100 Words: The Pursuit of Happiness

My one year old son seems to be in a perennial state of happiness. His playful presence and vibrant energy makes everyone around him happy. He knows how to make the most of simplest of things. “What’s his secret?” I was thinking to myself when heard I this wonderful story from a friend.

A man once asked a Buddhist monk, “I want happiness.” The monk smiled softly and said, “First remove ‘I’ – that is your ego. Then remove ‘want’ – that is your unending desire. Now all you are left with (and were born with) is ‘happiness’.

I got his secret!

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Also Read: Other 100 Word Parables

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In 100 Words: On Success, Happiness and Frugality


One definition of happiness is ‘ability to live life on your own terms.’ But sometimes, we define our happiness based on what others do, and then we try to ‘catch up’ with them compromising our own core values.

Aristippus, a Greek philosopher gained a comfortable position in the Kingdom through constant flattery of the King.

Aristippus once saw Diogenes, another Greek philosopher, dining on a meager meal of lentils and advised, “Learn to flatter the king and you will not have to live on lentils.”

Diogenes replied, “Learn to live on lentils and you will never have to flatter anyone.”

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Also Read: Other 100 Word Parables

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Quality is Happiness

Quality is not just “degree of excellence” or “conformance to requirements”. Quality is Happiness.

Happiness of people who work on product development. Happiness of clients who receive the product and are delighted to use it.

Only happy internal customers (peers, sub-ordinates, project team members, testing department) ultimately lead to happy customers.

If people don’t find the product they are developing to be useful, they would not be happy working on it. No one likes to produce anything that is useless.

When people believe in the vision/purpose of the product they are developing, they will happily “walk-that-extra-mile” to deliver Quality.

Happy people are more likely to produce better Quality. Great Quality delivered to clients makes them happy.

Unfortunately, most quality models focus heavily on “process” and less on “happiness”.

To comply with a rigid process is Management. To have happy, motivated people using process as a tool to ultimately deliver Quality is Leadership.